Sunday, March 10, 2019

Heritage walk in Pune

As of today this is what one gets to see of the famous bull and the golden plough which is supposed to be in the courtyard of Lal Mahal in Pune. The Lal Mahal itself is all barricaded and closed in the name of "restoration and renovation" I managed to get a part of the bull from a vantage point near the entrance. 




Did a Heritage walk in Pune this week and came to know about many things (and places) that existed in the city. The emphasis was more on the iconic women from the city who shaped Indian history.
Came to know about Queen Naganika. She was the first Indian female ruler to have coins to her name.
Inscriptions about her can be seen at Naneghat (near Junnar) 
The two silver coins dating back to the first century BCE have Naganika's name on it. Her name "Naganikaya" in Brahmi script is placed at the centre of the coin while the name of Satakarni (her husband) is placed below. 




Mastani (second wife of Maratha Peshwa Bajirao) lived in the north east part of Shaniwar Wada. It has a separate door and is named Mastani Darwaza. This tree just outside the Darwaza is huge and could probably tell the exact story of Mastani's short stay at Shaniwar wada.  



Another place we visited was the Bhausaheb Rangari's Bhavan. It was also a place where many freedom fighters met and stored weapons. The house was built in such a way that there were secret tunnels which would help the revolutionaries escape. 



This blue plaque identifies the residence of Dr Anandibai Joshi. 


She was the first woman from India who obtained a degree in Western Medicine. She died at an young age of 23 in 1887.

Anandibai Joshi graduated from the Woman's Medical College in Pennsylvania in 1886. All three completed their medical studies and each of them was the first woman from their respective countries to obtain a degree in western medicine.

On March 31st 2018, Google honored her with a Google Doodle to commemorate her 153rd birth anniversary.



Incidentally the Pune Bharat Gayan Samaj is housed in the same building which is more than a century old. 



Opposite this is the Pune Library, established in 1878 and the building still stands. 



Noticed some young artists trying to sketch these historical places. 



While doing the walk, we crossed the Mahatma Phule Mandai, which has been standing there for more than a century. 





I wonder if the boy still rings the bell every hour. Incidentally this boy's statute was installed after the tragedy in 1993 when 38 school kids lost their lives when their bus was hit by a train at an unmanned level crossing at Phursungi.  

The mandatory group picture of all who were enlightened by the walk. 


Made a short video showing all the stops that we took while walking.


29 comments:

Anonymous said...

I remember reading about the Phursungi tragedy long back in the papers. - Athawale

Susan Kane said...

A bus full of children whose lives were cut short. Oh, my. How the parents and community suffered!

Alley Cat is always a good tune.

Anonymous said...

Beautiful experience. Its so nice to know the history of the place we live in. - Faith

awadhut said...

Even though I am born and brought up in this city I looked at these places from new angle because of your post. Thanks for reviving those memories.

Anonymous said...

Excellent. I gained so much knowledge. Never knew so much about Pune inspite if having lived there for three years. - Col Kuldeep

Howard Hill said...

Great photos. Really nice to learn a bit of the history of Pune. Video has great music tracks.-Howard Hill

Anonymous said...

Wonderful Joe. Your production is getting better by the day. I did not know that Pune had heritage walks. - Elizabeth John

Bijoux said...

I feel so lucky to live in an era with a great choice of female doctors. Thank you for the walk!

Anonymous said...

Your articles are very informative and interesting. Had I not read this, I would never have known that brave ladies existed so long ago. Thank you very much. - Padmini

DUTA said...

Your video is priceless! Excellent way of summing up a post!

Restoration/Renovation barricades are very annoying when approaching a touristic site such as an historical building, a museum or an art gallery. I suspect it's usually done before political elections to show activity for the city's sake.

I suppose Queen Naganika and the young female doctor Amandibai Joshi are an inspiration for indian women.

Anvilcloud said...

It looks like a walk and tour well worth taking.

Anonymous said...

One day I am going to take this walk - Aiman Wordsworth

Joared said...

Very interesting — sometimes we overlook the history around us and think we have to travel to far away places. Thanks for stopping by my blog.

Christine said...

Interesting walk in Pune thanks for sharing. Well maybe it was in honour of the recent International Women’s Day!

Unknown said...

Excellent I gain so much knowledge...thanks Joe for sharing 👌👍

Anonymous said...

Thanks Joe for an interesting piece. I have been there, but today you have made it come alive for me. - Jacintha Rao

Anonymous said...

Very informative. This blog gives us an interesting glimpse of our history. - Loraine Cantem

Anonymous said...

Joe, very beautifully photographed and it was a walk down the memory lane. Some of the heritage places were known to me, but by and large there are some places which I ought to visit. I will be doing so in due course. Thank you very much. Keep posting. Regards, Anand Torvi

Mary Kirkland said...

You took great photos to share. I like seeing pictures of places that I'll probably never get to see myself so thank you for sharing them with us.

Unknown said...

Super photos of places probably seen but did not pay attention.
Thanks.

Anonymous said...

Very informative - Fr Colin Hendricks

Liz A. said...

Kind of sad about Dr Anandibai Joshi. If she died at 23, she didn't have that degree for very long.

ReHiTu said...

Very informative post; thanks...

Linda said...

Love the video! This is the only way I’ll ever get to visit and I look forward to following you! Thanks for your recent visit. You would love my husband- he plays and sings mostly old country music and folk music.....

Anonymous said...

Thank you Joe for sending me this very interesting and informative heritage walk through Poona. Well done. Recently I had viewed a Marathi film called "Gulab Jaam" in which Poona came through beautifully. You must watch it if you haven't. Regards, Jude Vaz

Sandra said...

it is sad she died so young after getting her degree. I liked the video of heritage walk. your photos are beautiful. I am like you and don't like posed photos. I also agree with your profile that we all need to seek happy....

Sandra said...

Lots of history in this post. Sad about the school children that were killed and Dr. Joshi dying so young.
Thanks for stopping by my blog:)

Anonymous said...

Very nice. Always enjoy reading anything about history of our places. - Sindhu

George said...

Thanks for the tour of this interesting city and the historical information you provided. I enjoyed the video -- the music is just right for a walking tour.